Wednesday, 27 February 2019

ETHICAL HACKING

ETHICAL HACKING


Ethical Hacking, also known as penetration testing, intrusion testing, or red teaming, is the controversial act of locating weaknesses and vulnerabilities of computer and information systems by duplicating the intent and actions of malicious hackers.
An Ethical Hacker, also known as a whitehat hacker, or simply a whitehat, is a security professional who applies their hacking skills for defensive purposes on behalf of the owners of information systems. Nowadays, certiļ¬ed ethical hackers are among the most sought after information security employees in large organizations such as Wipro, Infosys, IBM, Airtel and Reliance among others.


What is Ethical Hacking? 

 

Ethical hacking refers to the act of locating weaknesses and vulnerabilities of computer and information systems by duplicating the intent and actions of malicious hackers. Ethical hacking is also known as penetration testing, intrusion testing, or red teaming. An ethical hacker is a security professional who applies their hacking skills for defensive purposes on behalf of the owners of information systems. By conducting penetration tests, an ethical hacker looks to answer the following four basic questions [1] :
  1. What information/locations/systems can an attacker gain access?
  2. What can an attacker see on the target?
  3. What can an attacker do with available information?
  4. Does anyone at the target system notice the attempts?
An ethical hacker operates with the knowledge and permission of the organization for which they are trying to defend. In some cases, the organization will neglect to inform their information security team of the activities that will be carried out by an ethical hacker in an attempt to test the effectiveness of the information security team. This is referred to as a double-blind environment. In order to operate effectively and legally, an ethical hacker must be informed of the assets that should be protected, potential threat sources, and the extent to which the organization will support an ethical hacker's efforts


Ethical hacking refers to the act of locating weaknesses and vulnerabilities of computer and information systems by duplicating the intent and actions of malicious hackers. Ethical hacking is also known as penetration testing, intrusion testing, or red teaming. An ethical hacker is a security professional who applies their hacking skills for defensive purposes on behalf of the owners of information systems. By conducting penetration tests, an ethical hacker looks to answer the following four basic questions
  1. What information/locations/systems can an attacker gain access?
  2. What can an attacker see on the target?
  3. What can an attacker do with available information?
  4. Does anyone at the target system notice the attempts?
An ethical hacker operates with the knowledge and permission of the organization for which they are trying to defend. In some cases, the organization will neglect to inform their information security team of the activities that will be carried out by an ethical hacker in an attempt to test the effectiveness of the information security team. This is referred to as a double-blind environment. In order to operate effectively and legally, an ethical hacker must be informed of the assets that should be protected, potential threat sources, and the extent to which the organization will support an ethical hacker's efforts


Ethical Hacking History 

Since the 1980's, the Internet has vastly grown in popularity and computer security has become a major concern for businesses and governments. Organizations would like to use the Internet to their advantage by utilizing the Internet as a medium for e-commerce, advertising, information distribution and access, as well as other endeavors. However, they remain worried that they may be hacked which could lead to a loss of control of private and personal information regarding the organization, its employees, and its clients.
In a search for ways to reduce the fear and worry of being hacked, organizations have come to the realization that an effective way to evaluate security threats is to have independent security exerts attempt to hack into their computer systems. In the case of computer security, these tiger teams or ethical hackers would use the same tools and techniques as an attacker, but rather than damage the system or steal information, they would evaluate the system security and report the vulnerabilities they found and provide instructions for how to remedy them
 
From the early days of computers, ethical hacking has been used as an evaluation of system security. Many early ethical hacks were conducted by the United States Military to cary out security evaluations on their operating systems to determine whether they should employ a two-level (secret/top secret) classification system. However, with the growth of computing and networking in the early 1990's, computer and network vulnerability studies began to appear outside of the military organization. In December of 1993, two computer security researchers, Dan Farmer from Elemental Security and Wietse Venema from IBM, suggested that the techniques used by hackers can be used to asses the security of an information system. They wrote a report that was shared publicly on the Internet which described how they were able to gather enough information to compromise security and they provided several examples of how this information could be gathered and exploited to gain control of a system, and how such an attack could be prevented.
Farmer and Venema realized that the testing that they had performed was complex and time-consuming, so they packaged all of the tools that they had used during their work and developed an easy-to-use application free for download. Their program, called Security Analysis Tool for Auditing Networks, or SATAN, received a great amount of media attention due to its capabilities and implications. The SATAN tool provided auditing capability as well as capabilities to provide advice regarding how the user may be able to correct the problems that were discovered.

The Ethical Hacking Process

Ethical hackers must follow a strict scientific process in order to obtain useable and legal results [4].

Planning

Planning is essential for having a successful project. It provides an opportunity to give critical thought to what needs to be done, allows for goals to be set, and allows for a risk assessment to evaluate how a project should be carried out.
There are a large number of external factors that need to be considered when planning to carry out an ethical hack. These factors include existing security policies, culture, laws and regulations, best practices, and industry requirements. Each of these factors play an integral role in the decision making process when it comes to ethical hacking. The planning phase of an ethical hack will have a profound influence on how the hack is performed and the information shared and collected, and will directly influence the deliverable and integration of the results into the security program.
The planning phase will describe many of the details of a controlled attack. It will attempt to answer questions regarding how the attack is going to be supported and controlled, what the underlying actions that must be performed and who does what, when, where, and for how long.


Reconnaissance

Reconnaissance is the search for freely available information to assist in an attack. This can be as simple as a ping or browsing newsgroups on the Internet in search of disgruntled employees divulging secret information or as messy as digging through the trash to find receipts or letters.
Reconnaissance can include social engineering, tapping phones and networks, or even theft. The search for information is limited only by the extremes at which the organization and ethical hacker are willing to go in order to recover the information they are searching for.
The reconnaissance phase introduces the relationship between the tasks that must be completed and the methods that will need to be used in order to protect the organization's assets and information.






 



No comments:

Post a comment

A Simple Trick For Converting Any Image Into PDF In Your PC

The process of converting  images  to  PDF  files could be a difficult thing and would include a lot of efforts as well if you don’t know ...